Dyslexia: Facts About This
Learning Impairment

Dyslexia is a language-based impairment acquired from differences in brain structure and brain assignment. Although this impairment presents itself quite differently in each child, it has some standard characteristics that can be determined by means of evaluation. Symptoms are differing in degree, but it's true that dyslexia has a determined definition and can easily be diagnosed by a professional examiner. Not all problems in children with this impairment are discernible but the most common is the incapability to read.Dyslexia is a language-based impairment acquired from differences in brain structure and brain assignment.Although this impairment presents itself quite differently in each child, it has some standard characteristics that can be determined by means of evaluation. Symptoms are differing in degree, but it's true that dyslexia has a determined definition and can easily be diagnosed by a professional examiner. Not all problems in children with this impairment are discernible but the most common is the incapability to read.

"Dyslexia is a particular learning impairment that is neurological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with correct and/or articulate word detection, and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties customarily result from a deficiency in the phonological component of speech that is many times unplanned in connection to alternate perceptual abilities and the provision of beneficial classroom training. Secondary consequences may incorporate problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading familiarity that can slow the development of terminology and background understanding."

Here are a few amazing facts about dyslexia and interrelated language-based learning disabilities:
1. As much as 15-20% of the population has some type of reading impairment.
2. Dyslexia does not discriminate; it knows no ethnic or financial boundaries, and affects males and females almost equally.
3. The genetic links for dyslexia are inheritable.
4. Dyslexia is the most likely cause of reading, writing and spelling difficulties.
5. Out of all the students with established learning disabilities who are given specialized educational services, more than 70%of these students will have deficits in reading.
6. If children who are dyslexic get effective phonetic training in their early years (preschool and 1st grade), they may have considerably fewer problems in learning to read at grade level than do children who are not identified or helped until the 3rd grade.
7. Almost 75% of children who could not read sufficiently by the 3rd grade remained poor readers throughout their school days and could not read adequately even into their adult years.

The resulting difficulties may be connected with dyslexia if they are unforeseen for the child's age, academic level, or conceptual abilities. To determine whether a child is dyslexic, he or she needs to be tested sufficiently by a professional.

Here are a few things to observe for in preschool-aged children:
- The child may not begin talking at the same age as their peers; often times speech is delayed.
- Often has problems with rhyming words or poems.
- Has difficulty recalling and using correct terminology.
- May have a hard time pronouncing words, i.e., can’t say the names of their siblings and, therefore, brother becomes bubba; or, for spaghetti they may say busgetti, or lawn mower becomes mawn lower.
- Building their vocabulary puts a tremendous strain on them.
- Learning the alphabet, numbers, days of the week, colors, shapes, how to spell and write their own name is unusually difficult.
- Interacting and playing with other children is troublesome.
- Often narrates stories incorrectly or not in the right grouping or arrangement.
- Problems with multitasking and can’t do more than one step at a time.
- Delayed development of motor skills.
- Frequently has difficulty detaching sounds in words and uniting sounds to build terms.

For children 5-10 years of age, observe for any of these tell-tale signs:
- Your child may have difficulty reading single terms or recognizing single words that are by themselves.
- They may create the identical reading and spelling mistakes over and over; they are inclined to confuse little terms like said/and, goes/does, to/at.
- Watch for character reversals…b for d as in bog for dog; inverting letters like n for u and w for m.
- Terminology switch is also routine; for example, pit for tip, left for felt, and substituting words such as house and home.
- They many times exchange sequences in numbers and have trouble with mathematical signs, i.e., such as =, +, -, x,

Alternate tale-tell signs to look for:
- Incorporate hardship in planning things.
- Prone to accidents.
- Problems recollecting information.
- Problems learning to tell time.
- Problems gripping pencils and crayons.

Teaching students with learning disabilities and dyslexia can be overwhelming and challenging. Although current analysis has shown that students with learning disabilities such as dyslexia can gain extensively from one-on-one instruction in phonics and character-by-character terminology recognition, they need the assistance of an organized constructed program and solid reading assistance at home as well!



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